Interested In Joining 4-H?

Traditional Clubs

(age is calculated as of January 1st of the 4-H year)

4-H Clubs are organized groups of boys and girls (minimum of five, ages 5-18) who are supported by adult volunteer leaders. The club conducts meetings and activities throughout the year, usually holding six or more official meetings annually and frequently includes opportunities for leadership, citizenship and public speaking. It is authorized through the county and state to use the 4-H name and emblem.

4-H Clubs engage youth in projects such as science, technology, nutrition, public speaking, community service and more. 4-H'ers may participate in more than one project. Many 4-H'ers participate in projects over several years, working towards mastery in a subject or skill.

A 4-H Club:

  • Is an organized group of at least five youth, ages 8-18
  • Elects officers
  • Plans and adopts projects and activities that will provide fun learning experiences and blend with the interests of the club
  • Is advised by adult volunteers and 4-H staff
  • May meet in any location
  • Offers opportunities for leadership, citizenship and community service both locally and statewide

Cloverbuds

(age is calculated as of January 1st of the 4-H year)

The 4-H Cloverbud program is a special part of Cooperative Extension's 4-H Youth Development Program.Tailored to the developmental needs of 5 - 8 year olds, it provides fun, informal educational activities that promote positive child development, such as:

  • Exploring current interest through hands-on learning
  • Learning new things about science, literature and the arts
  • Developing relationships with adults and older youths
  • Life skills such as social interaction, mastering physical skills, and decision making
  • Giving to others through community service
  • Meeting new friends and HAVING FUN!

The educational component of Cloverbuds consists of activities rather than projects (sample activity). Cloverbuds are eligible to participate in county events, such as the county fair and public presentation. The focus is participation based on developmental appropriateness rather than competition.

Last updated April 26, 2016