Food Preservation & Preparation

If you are pursuing a homesteading and self sufficient lifestyle, this page will provide valuable resources on food preservation and preparation.

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Click Here to read Canning Meat for the Homestead By Diane Whitten, MS, Master Food Preserver, Food and Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Extending Your Garden Produce into Winter By Diane Whitten, MS, Master Food Preserver, Food and Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Make Your Own Fresh Mozzarella & Ricotta Cheese By Diane Whitten, MS, Master Food Preserver, Food and Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Using Dehydrated Foods By Diane Whitten, MS, Master Food Preserver, Food and Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Food Borne Illness Peaks in Summer: Practice Picnic Food Safety By Diane Whitten, MS, Master Food Preserver, Food and Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to Read Making Fruit Leather, by By Emily Hall, Dietetic Intern Sage Colleges

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Click Here to read Plan Ahead for Canning Season by Diane Whitten, Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Home Cheesemaking by By Kerri E. Kaylegian, PH.D. Penn State Extension Dairy Foods Research and Extension Associate

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Click Here to read The Value of Cold Storage Vegetables by Diane Whitten, Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Monitoring Your Home Freezer by Diane Whitten, Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Soup's On by Diane Whitten, Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Stocking up on Dry Milk by Diane Whitten, Nutrition Educator

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Click Here to read Homemade Fruit Leather: A Great Snack or Gift by Diane Whitten

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Click Here to Read Homemade Pumpkin Puree by Diane Whitten

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Click Here to Read Farmers’ Markets Now Indoors: Plan a Local Thanksgiving by Diane Whitten

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Click Here to Read Keeping Food Safe During a Power Outage by Diane Whitten

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Click Here to Read Storing Produce without Refrigeration or Preservation by Diane Whitten

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Click Here to Read Making Meat Jerky by Diane Whitten

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If you plan to do any pressure canning, it’s time to get your pressure gauge tested. The USDA National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends testing gauges each year before use to insure its accuracy. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Saratoga and Albany County offer this free service. Using a Presto Dial Gauge Testing Unit our educators test your gauge against our annually calibrated gauge. Having proper pressure is essential to safe pressure canning and prevention of botulism food poisoning. A gauge that is off by up to two pounds can still be used with the proper adjustment, a gauge that is off by more than two pounds should be replaced. Call to make an appointment for pressure gauge testing: CCE Albany County – 518-765-3500 or Diane Whitten, Nutrition & Food Resource Educator of CCE Saratoga County – 518-885-8995.

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Click Here to read Can Food With Less Water by Diane Whitten

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Click Here to read Using a Steam Canner by Diane Whitten 

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Yogurt is a cultured dairy product that can be made from whole, lowfat or skim milk, including reconstituted nonfat dry milk powder. Although most yogurt in the United States is made from cow's milk, any type of milk can be used. In other countries, yogurt is made from the milk of water buffalo, yak, goat, horses and sheep. As interest in raising goats increases in the United States, so does the popularity of making yogurt from goat's milk.

If you like yogurt and eat it often, you may enjoy preparing yogurt at home. Depending on the form of milk used, you will probably save money, as well. The guidelines and procedures in this guide will help you make a quality product.

Click here to read "Making Yogurt at Home: Country Living Series" by Barbara J. Willenberg, Karla Vollmar Hughes and Lyn Konstant, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition of University of Missouri Extension. 

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Click here to read Preparing an Emergency Food Supply by Diane Whitten

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Click here to read Food Preservation by Diane Whitten

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Click here to read Beans: A Pantry Staple by Diane Whitten

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Click here to read Making Bread from Scratch by Diane Whitten

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Click here to read Preserving Rhubarb with recipes by Diane Whitten

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  • Preparing an Emergency Food Supply, Short Term Food Storage, https://s3.amazonaws.com/assets.cce.cornell.edu/attachments/2920/Preparing_an_Emergency_Food_Supply_ShortTerm.pdf?1411568494 This 7 page resource includes suggested foods to have stored for a three day and two week emergency supply, plus FAQs about food dates and storage.
  • Food and Water in an Emergency, https://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/f&web.pdf This 14 page publication includes suggestions for a two week food and water supply, finding hidden water sources in your home, ways to treat water, and items to include in a disaster supply kit.
  • Consumer's_Guide_to_Food_Safety_Severe_Storm___Hurricane.pdf
  • This 12 page guide includes information about how to keep food safe during and after an emergency including salvaging food after a flood or power outage with lists of what to keep and what to toss, and evaluating the safety of drinking water after a flood.
  • Make An Emergency Food Supply Kit, http://www.ready.gov/food Following a disaster, there may be power outages that could last for several days. Stock canned foods, dry mixes and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking, water or special preparation. Be sure to include a manual can opener and eating utensils.
  • Keep Your Food Safe During Emergencies: Power Outages, Floods & Fires, https://www.fsis.usda.gov/(search for title) This 12 page booklet gives guidelines for what to do when the power goes out to prevent food loss, also including what to keep and what to toss when power is restored.
  • Determining Water Needs, https://www.ready.gov/water Following a disaster, clean drinking water may not be available. Your regular water source could be cut-off or compromised through contamination. Prepare yourself by building a supply of water that will meet your family’s needs during an emergency.

Contact

Diane Whitten
Community Nutrition/Health
dsh23@cornell.edu
518-885-8995 ext. 2220

Last updated October 13, 2021